Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for The New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: Mike Rogers is a former FBI agent, chairman of the house intelligence committee. For him to suggest that Snowden may have been an agent working for Russian Intelligence from the very beginning, he must have some inkling of evidence to back that up, I suspect? Mayer: yeah, that's why I think it's important -- this is someone with a very important title who's making these allegations. And he talked about clues, unspecified clues. I called his office to see if I could get him to explain a little bit more and he didn't want to discuss it. He wouldn't comment further. But what he is saying is not only denied by Snowden, it also is contradicted by several investigations, the FBI's been investigating and the NSA's been investigating, and the CIA has been investigating. They've all been looking for the possibility that Snowden's working with foreign governments and at the moment, none of them have found evidence.
Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for The New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: Were you surprised that Dianne Feinstein sort of said, I can't rule that out (Snowden may have been an agent working for Russian Intelligence from the very beginning)? She's the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee. Mayer: Yes. In some ways, though, when I called her office, they basically said she was just asking questions. They're not really saying she's standing by this. In some way, she was being polite and saying, who knows? It's interesting that they would float something so serious.
Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for The New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: He also told you this -- he said, no one has credibly shown any harm to national security. The president himself admitted both that changes are necessary and that he is certain the debate my actions started will make us stronger. Although the President in that long interview with David Remnick in your magazine did say there was major damage to national security. Mayer: He (the President) basically said that there was more damage than good that came out of it. But he has, as Mr. Snowden is saying, said that it has provoked a debate that has been useful in this country. And what Snowden said to me was, I've brought the American public to the table. And he also said, you know, if in fact he's smeared and his reputation is ruined, he said, if I end up in a ditch at the end of the day and reform comes out of this, it will be worth of it.
Jane Mayer
Staff Writer for the New Yorker
CNNW 01/22/2014
Blitzer: He (Snowden) also told you this -- he said, no one has credibly shown any harm to national security. The president himself admitted both that changes are necessary and that he is certain the debate my actions started will make us stronger. Although the President in that long interview with David Remnick in your magazine did say there was major damage to national security. Mayer: He (the President) basically said that there was more damage than good that came out of it. But he has, as Mr. Snowden is saying, said that it has provoked a debate that has been useful in this country. And what Snowden said to me was, I've brought the American public to the table. And he also said, you know, if in fact he's smeared and his reputation is ruined, he said, if I end up in a ditch at the end of the day and reform comes out of this, it will be worth of it.
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